Journal Article

Postoperative Spondylodiskitis: Etiology, Clinical Findings, Prognosis, and Comparison with Nonoperative Pyogenic Spondylodiskitis

Manuel E. Jiménez-Mejías, Juan de Dios Colmenero, Fernando J. Sánchez-Lora, Julián Palomino-Nicás, José M. Reguera, Joaquín García de la Heras, María A. García-Ordoñez and Jerónimo Pachón

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 2, pages 339-345
Published in print July 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/520212
Postoperative Spondylodiskitis: Etiology, Clinical Findings, Prognosis, and Comparison with Nonoperative Pyogenic Spondylodiskitis

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We studied 31 cases of postoperative pyogenic spondylodiskitis (POS), comparing them with 72 cases of nonpostoperative pyogenic spondylodiskitis (NPOS). POS represents 30.1% of cases of pyogenic spondylodiskitis. The onset of symptoms occurred an average (±SD) of 27.7 (± 25.3) days following surgery. Predisposing factors were less frequent in POS than NPOS cases (P = .002). Neurological complications and inflammatory signs in the spine were more frequent with POS than with NPOS (P = .002 and P < .00001). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and anaerobic bacteria were more frequent in POS than in NPOS (P = .0001 and P = .05). Percutaneous bone biopsies yielded the etiology in 66.7% of cases, open bone biopsies in 100%, blood cultures in 55.6%, and cultures of adjacent foci in 94.4%. Eleven patients (35.5%) were cured with antimicrobial treatment, but surgical treatment was necessary in 64.5%. No relapses or deaths were recorded. Seventeen patients (54.8%) had severe functional sequelae, which were associated with inflammatory signs in the spine (P = .033), higher levels of leukocytosis (P = .05), higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (P = .05), and paravertebral abscesses (P = .04).

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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