Journal Article

Evaluation of an Intensive Intermittent-Induction Regimen and Duration of Short-Course Treatment for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Pulmonary Tuberculosis

Wafaa M. El-Sadr, David C. Perlman, John P. Matts, Eileen T. Nelson, David L. Cohn, Nadim Salomon, Margaret Olibrice, Frantz Medard, Keith D. Chirgwin, Donna Mildvan, Brenda E. Jones, Edward E. Telzak, Oscar Klein, Leonid Heifets and Richard Hafner

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 5, pages 1148-1158
Published in print May 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/520275
Evaluation of an Intensive Intermittent-Induction Regimen and Duration of Short-Course Treatment for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Pulmonary Tuberculosis

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This study examined whether adding levofloxacin to a standard four-drug regimen improved the 8-week culture response and compared effectiveness of 9 versus 6 months of intermittent therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-related pansusceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients were randomized to receive either four or five drugs, the fifth being levofloxacin. Patients who completed induction therapy were randomized to complete 9 versus 6 months of intermittent therapy with isoniazid and rifampin. In the randomized induction phase, 97.3% of patients in the four-drug group and 95.8% in the five-drug group had sputum culture conversion at 8 weeks (P = 1.00). In the continuation phase, one patient (2%) assigned to 9 months and two patients (3.9%) assigned to 6 months of therapy had treatment failure/relapse (P = 1.00). In conclusion, this study showed that levofloxacin added no benefit to a highly effective, largely intermittent, four-drug induction regimen. Both 9 and 6 months of intermittent therapy were associated with low treatment failure/relapse rates.

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Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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