Journal Article

Genesis of Methicillin-Resistant <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> (MRSA), How Treatment of MRSA Infections Has Selected for Vancomycin-Resistant <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, and the Importance of Antibiotic Management and Infection Control

Jerome J. Schentag, Judith M. Hyatt, James R. Carr, Joseph A. Paladino, Mary C. Birmingham, Gabrial S. Zimmer and Thomas J. Cumbo

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 26, issue 5, pages 1204-1214
Published in print May 1998 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 1998 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/520287
Genesis of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), How Treatment of MRSA Infections Has Selected for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium, and the Importance of Antibiotic Management and Infection Control

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We extensively studied the epidemiology and time course of endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the Millard Fillmore Hospital, a 600-bed teaching hospital in Buffalo. The changeover from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus to MRSA begins on the first hospital day, when patients are given cefazolin as presurgical prophylaxis. Under selective antibiotic pressure, colonizing flora change within 24 to 48 hours. For patients remaining hospitalized, subsequent courses of third-generation cephalosporins further select and amplify the colonizing MRSA population. Therefore, managing antibiotic selective pressure might be essential. Other strategies include attention to dosing, so that serum concentrations of drug exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration, and antibiotic cycling. Although there are some promising new antibiotics on the horizon, it is necessary to deal with many resistance patterns by using the combined strategies of infection control and antibiotic management.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.