Journal Article

Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Adenovirus after T Cell–Replete Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Viral Load as a Marker for Invasive Disease

Veronique Erard, Meei-Li Huang, James Ferrenberg, Long Nguy, Terry L Stevens Ayers, Robert C. Hackman, Lawrence Corey and Michael Boeckh

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue 8, pages 958-965
Published in print October 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/521851
Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Adenovirus after T Cell–Replete Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Viral Load as a Marker for Invasive Disease

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Background. The value of adenovirus plasma DNA detection as an indicator for adenovirus disease is unknown in the context of T cell–replete hematopoietic cell transplantation, of which adenovirus disease is an uncommon but serious complication.

Methods. Three groups of 62 T cell–replete hematopoietic cell transplant recipients were selected and tested for adenovirus in plasma by polymerase chain reaction.

Results. Adenovirus was detected in 21 (87.5%) of 24 patients with proven adenovirus disease (group 1), in 4 (21%) of 19 patients who shed adenovirus (group 2), and in 1 (10.5%) of 19 uninfected control patients. The maximum viral load was significantly higher in group 1 (median maximum viral load, 6.3 × 106 copies/mL; range, 0 to 1.0 × 109 copies/mL) than in group 2 (median maximum viral load, 0 copies/mL; range, 0 to 1.7 × 108 copies/mL; P < .001) and in group 3 (median maximum viral load, 0 copies/mL; range 0–40 copies/mL; P < .001). All patients in group 2 who developed adenoviremia had symptoms compatible with adenovirus disease (i.e., possible disease). A minimal plasma viral load of 103 copies/mL was detected in all patients with proven or possible disease. Adenoviremia was detectable at a median of 19.5 days (range, 8–48 days) and 24 days (range, 9–41 days) before death for patients with proven and possible adenovirus disease, respectively.

Conclusion. Sustained or high-level adenoviremia appears to be a specific and sensitive indicator of adenovirus disease after T cell–replete hematopoietic cell transplantation. In the context of low prevalence of adenovirus disease, the use of polymerase chain reaction of plasma specimens to detect virus might be a valuable tool to identify and treat patients at risk for viral invasive disease.

Journal Article.  4094 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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