Journal Article

Leukocyte Reduction's Role in the Attenuation of Infection Risks among Transfusion Recipients

Joseph S. Cervia, Barry Wenz and Girolamo A. Ortolano

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue 8, pages 1008-1013
Published in print October 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/521896
Leukocyte Reduction's Role in the Attenuation of Infection Risks among Transfusion Recipients

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Despite advances in the screening of donated blood for infectious agents, the risk of transmitting viral, bacterial, and protozoal infections, as well as newly emerging diseases, via transfusion persists. A complementary approach is leukocyte reduction (LR), the removal of leukocytes from donated blood by filtration. Published evidence, establishing the benefit of LR in reducing the risk of febrile nonhemolytic reactions, cytomegalovirus transmission, and human leukocyte antigen alloimmunization has led to its use for some time for the care of immunosuppressed and other individuals considered to be at high risk for such complications. Recent literature suggests that LR may be effective in reducing the risk of transmission of a number of additional transfusion-transmitted infectious agents, including herpesviruses, retroviruses, bacteria, protozoa, and prions. There is also evidence that LR may reduce the risk of transfusion-related immunomodulation, further contributing to protection against infections that would complicate treatment. With the mounting evidence of potential benefit, a number of countries, as well as many hospitals and blood centers in the United States, have adopted a policy of performing LR for all donated blood. Physicians who care for immunosuppressed patients and those who are responsible for institutional infection-control practices should remain informed of the growing body of literature on LR.

Journal Article.  5099 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.