Journal Article

The Growing Threat of Foodborne Bacterial Enteropathogens of Animal Origin

Herbert L. DuPont

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 45, issue 10, pages 1353-1361
Published in print November 2007 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2007 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/522662
The Growing Threat of Foodborne Bacterial Enteropathogens of Animal Origin

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Campylobacter and Salmonella species and Shiga toxin—producing Escherichia coli (STEC; the majority of which are type O157:H7) efficiently enter the human food chain from infected or colonized animals. Poultry contamination with Campylobacter and/or Salmonella species and produce contamination with STEC have become major public health challenges. The global food supply, which allows us to purchase desired items throughout the year, a growing interest in consuming fresh vegetables and fruits, and an increasing number of persons who consume foods at restaurants all assure that the health threats associated with these pathogens will continue. Antibiotic use by humans and food animals selects for the development of resistance among Campylobacter and Salmonella strains, promoting invasive forms of infection and complicating therapy of illness. A comprehensive public health approach is needed that focuses on disease surveillance and infection control in the food industry continuum, from harvesting and processing, to distribution, to later preparation in public eating establishments and in homes. Good Agricultural Practices, including the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Program and validation of critical infection-control points at all stages of the food industry cycle, coupled with other food safety interventions, including irradiation for certain higher-risk foods, should help us improve the quality of food with regard to microbials and reduce human disease.

Journal Article.  6471 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.