Journal Article

Public Health Surveillance for Suspected Smallpox in the United States, 2003–2005: Results of a National Survey

Sonja S. Hutchins, Guthrie S. Birkhead, Kristin Kenyan, John Abellera and Jennifer Lemmings

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 46, issue Supplement_3, pages S204-S211
Published in print March 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/524743
Public Health Surveillance for Suspected Smallpox in the United States, 2003–2005: Results of a National Survey

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In 2005, a Web-based survey of chief epidemiologists of 50 states, the District of Columbia, 9 large cities, and 8 territories examined the status of US smallpox surveillance after the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommended that smallpox be reportable. Of 55 respondents, 95% reported state or territory laws or regulations governing smallpox reporting; 70% of states required laboratories to report variola virus. All respondents could investigate reported suspected patients; 70%–89% would investigate initially by telephone or fax. In 2004, 11 states reported 33 patients suspected of having smallpox. Reports were more likely in states that provided ⩾2 educational and training sessions (67% vs. 21%; prevalence odds ratio, 7.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–60.45). The goal is a public health surveillance system in which all states, cities, and territories can detect and manage suspected smallpox cases urgently and in which overall surveillance for other infectious diseases is strengthened.

Journal Article.  3967 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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