Journal Article

Pregnancy, Birth, and Infant Health Outcomes from the National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry, 2003–2006

Margaret A. K. Ryan and Jane F. Seward

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 46, issue Supplement_3, pages S221-S226
Published in print March 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/524744
Pregnancy, Birth, and Infant Health Outcomes from the National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry, 2003–2006

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When the United States implemented civilian and military smallpox vaccination programs in 2003, the National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry was established to better evaluate outcomes after the inadvertent vaccination of pregnant women. Women were referred to the registry by vaccine administrators, health care providers, or state health departments or through self-referral. Registry professionals actively follow up with all enrolled women and collect data on pregnancy, birth, and infant health outcomes. As of September 2006, pregnancy outcome data were available from 376 women. Most (77%) were vaccinated near the time of conception, before results of a standard pregnancy test would have been positive. To date, outcome evaluations have not revealed higher-than-expected rates of pregnancy loss (11.9%), preterm birth (10.7%), or birth defects (2.8%), compared with those in healthy referent populations. No cases of fetal vaccinia have been identified. The Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry continues to actively enroll women and follow infant and early-childhood health outcomes.

Journal Article.  4185 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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