Journal Article

Association between Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells and Disease Progression after Infection with Closely Related Strains of HIV in China

Haishan Li, Hong Peng, Pengfei Ma, Yuhua Ruan, Bing Su, Xinping Ding, Chen Xu, C. David Pauza and Yiming Shao

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 46, issue 9, pages 1466-1472
Published in print May 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/587107
Association between Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells and Disease Progression after Infection with Closely Related Strains of HIV in China

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Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and disease are accompanied by decreases in the absolute number and function of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, suggesting that this subset of cells may play an important role in controlling disease. We performed a cross-sectional study involving HIV-infected former blood donors and assessed the association between Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and markers of disease progression.

Methods. Changes in Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count and function were compared between HIV-infected individuals and healthy blood donors using the Mann-Whitney U test. The relationships between Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count, plasma viral load, and CD4 T cell count were analyzed using the Spearman correlation.

Results. We found significant positive correlations between CD4 T cell count and both total Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count (P<.001) and functional (isopentenyl pyrophosphate—responsive) Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count (P<.001). We found significant reverse correlations between viral load and both total Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count (P<.05) and functional Vγ2Vδ2 T cell count (P<.05).

Conclusions. The association of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells with disease progression in 146 HIV-infected participants supports the view that intact Vγ2Vδ2 T cell populations are important for controlling HIV disease.

Journal Article.  3580 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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