Journal Article

Entecavir Therapy Induces de Novo HIV Reverse-Transcriptase M184V Mutation in an Antiretroviral Therapy—Naive Patient

Martin R. Jakobsen, Hanne Arildsen, Henrik B. Krarup, Martin Tolstrup, Lars Østergaard and Alex L. Laursen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 46, issue 9, pages e88-e91
Published in print May 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/587174
Entecavir Therapy Induces de Novo HIV Reverse-Transcriptase M184V Mutation in an Antiretroviral Therapy—Naive Patient

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Recently, entecavir was introduced as a potent drug against hepatitis B virus infection. Initially, it was suggested not to have any effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This guideline was revised in 2007 because of a report showing that the M184V mutation was selected in an hepatitis B virus and HIV-coinfected patient previously treated with lamivudine. Our investigation revealed findings similar to those preveiously reported but in an antiretroviral therapy—naive patient coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B virus. After 26 weeks of entecavir therapy, the M184V mutation dominated the plasma viral population. Thus, entecavir should only be used for coinfected patients who simultaneously receive suppressive therapy against HIV infection.

Journal Article.  2175 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.