Journal Article

Population Seroprevalence of Human Papillomavirus Types 6, 11, 16, and 18 in Men, Women, and Children in Australia

Anthony T. Newall, Julia M. L. Brotherton, Helen E. Quinn, Peter B. McIntyre, Josephine Backhouse, Lynn Gilbert, Mark T. Esser, Joanne Erick, Janine Bryan, Neil Formica and C. Raina MacIntyre

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 46, issue 11, pages 1647-1655
Published in print June 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/587895
Population Seroprevalence of Human Papillomavirus Types 6, 11, 16, and 18 in Men, Women, and Children in Australia

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Background. Representative population-based data on human papillomavirus (HPV) epidemiology are important for public health decision making but are difficult to obtain. Seroepidemiology is a valuable tool, although the relationship between HPV infection and seropositivity is incomplete.

Methods. We obtained a large representative sample using residual diagnostic test serum samples obtained from individuals aged 0–69 years (1247 samples from male patients and 1523 samples from female patients) in Australia. Serum antibody levels to HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 were measured using an immunoassay.

Results. Overall, seroprevalence of HPV types 6 and 16 was higher than seroprevalence of HPV types 11 and 18. Among female patients, peak HPV seropositivity occurred among those who were 30–39 years of age for types 6, 16, and 18 (22%, 22%, and 10.5%, respectively) and among those who were 40–49 years of age for HPV 11 (11.8%). Among male subjects, peak HPV seropositivity occurred among those who were 40–49 years of age for types 6 and 11 (15.4% and 9.1%, respectively) and among those who were 50–59 years of age for types 16 and 18 (14.3% and 8.2%, respectively). No cases of HPV seropositivity were detected in individuals <10 years of age.

Conclusions. Australian seroepidemiological data, showing differing age-specific patterns of HPV seropositivity in male and female patients, are likely to be generalizable to other developed countries and add to other data supporting completion of HPV vaccination before adolescence.

Journal Article.  5659 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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