Journal Article

Update on the Efficacy and Tolerability of Meropenem in the Treatment of Serious Bacterial Infections

John F. Mohr

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 47, issue Supplement_1, pages S41-S51
Published in print September 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/590065
Update on the Efficacy and Tolerability of Meropenem in the Treatment of Serious Bacterial Infections

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Meropenem is a carbapenem antibiotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and pediatric bacterial meningitis (in patients ⩾3 months of age). In clinical trials, it also has shown efficacy as initial empirical therapy for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. Unlike other β-lactam antibiotics, including third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems have shown activity against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing and AmpC chromosomal β-lactamase-producing bacteria. Compared with imipenem, meropenem is more active against gram-negative pathogens and somewhat less active against gram-positive pathogens, and it does not require coadministration of a renal dehydropeptidase inhibitor. In most comparative trials, clinical and bacteriological response rates with imipenem and meropenem were similar. Compared with clindamycin/tobramycin, meropenem is associated with a reduced length of hospital stay and a shorter duration of therapy among patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. Meropenem is well tolerated by children and adults and has an acceptable safety profile. Alternative meropenem dosing strategies for the optimization of outcomes are under investigation.

Journal Article.  6918 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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