Journal Article

Epidemiologic and Microbiologic Characteristics of Recurrent Bacterial and Fungal Meningitis in The Netherlands, 1988–2005

Joris J. van Driel, Vincent Bekker, Lodewijk Spanjaard, Arie van der Ende and Taco W. Kuijpers

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 47, issue 5, pages e42-e51
Published in print September 2008 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2008 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/590251
Epidemiologic and Microbiologic Characteristics of Recurrent Bacterial and Fungal Meningitis in The Netherlands, 1988–2005

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Patients may experience multiple episodes of bacterial meningitis. Information from large studies of recurrent meningitis is limited. We evaluated the incidence of recurrent bacterial meningitis and the distribution of causative organisms in The Netherlands.

Methods. Data for patients with bacterial meningitis were prospectively collected nationwide for the period 1988–2005. Recurrent meningitis was defined as an episode of meningitis that either occurred ⩾28 days after a previous episode or occurred <28 days after a previous episode but was caused by a different pathogen or different subtype of the same pathogen.

Results. Of 18,915 patients, 202 (predominantly male) patients had recurrent bacterial meningitis (P<.01). Prevailing causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (40% of cases), Neisseria meningitidis (22%), and non-type b Haemophilus influenzae (9%). Pneumococci serotypes included in the heptavalent vaccine caused only 36% of cases of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis. The proportion of episodes caused by meningococcus serogroups W135, Y, and Z was higher among patients with recurrent meningitis than among those with nonrecurrent meningitis (odds ratio, 12.8), and the proportion caused by nontypeable and type f H. influenzae was also higher among patients with recurrent meningitis (odds ratio, 3.8 and 5.6, respectively).

Conclusions. In The Netherlands, the prevalence of recurrent bacterial and fungal meningitis is low. The distribution of causative microorganisms differs between cases of recurrent meningitis and cases of nonrecurrent meningitis; this could be associated with vaccination.

Journal Article.  4967 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.