Journal Article

Incidence of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Requiring Hospitalization in Rural Thailand

Henry C. Baggett, Leonard F. Peruski, Sonja J. Olsen, Somsak Thamthitiwat, Julia Rhodes, Surang Dejsirilert, Wanna Wongjindanon, Scott F. Dowell, Julie E. Fischer, Peera Areerat, Denchai Sornkij, Possawat Jorakate, Anek Kaewpan, Prabda Prapasiri, Sathapana Naorat, Leelawadee Sangsuk, Boonchuay Eampokalap, Matthew R. Moore, Gloria Carvalho, Bernard Beall, Kumnuan Ungchusak and Susan A. Maloney

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 48, issue Supplement_2, pages S65-S74
Published in print March 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/596484
Incidence of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Requiring Hospitalization in Rural Thailand

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Population-based estimates of the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease are unavailable for Thailand and other countries in Southeast Asia. We estimated the incidence of pneumococcal bacteremia cases requiring hospitalization in rural Thailand.

Methods. Blood cultures were performed on samples from hospitalized patients in 2 rural provinces where active, population-based surveillance of community-acquired pneumonia is conducted. Blood cultures were performed at clinician discretion and were encouraged for all patients with suspected pneumonia and all children aged <5 years with suspected sepsis. Pneumococcal antigen testing was performed on positive blood culture specimens that failed to grow organisms on subculture.

Results. From May 2005 through June 2007, 23,853 blood culture specimens were collected overall, and 7319 were collected from children aged <5 years, which represented 66% and 47% of target patients, respectively. A total of 72 culture-confirmed pneumococcal bacteremia cases requiring hospitalization were identified. An additional 44 patients had media from positive blood cultures that yielded no growth on subculture but that had positive results of pneumococcal antigen testing. Of the 116 confirmed cases of bacteremia, 27 (23%) occurred in children aged <5 years; of these, 9 (33%) were confirmed by antigen testing only. The incidence of pneumococcal bacteremia cases requiring hospitalization among children aged <5 years had a range of 10.6–28.9 cases per 100,000 persons (incidence range if cases detected by antigen are excluded, 7.5–14.0 cases per 100,000 persons).

Conclusions. Invasive pneumococcal disease is more common than was previously suspected in Thailand, even on the basis of estimates limited to hospitalized cases of bacteremia. These estimates, which are close to estimates of the incidence of hospitalized cases of pneumococcal bacteremia in the United States before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, provide important data to guide public health care policy and to inform discussions about vaccine introduction in Thailand and the rest of Southeast Asia.

Journal Article.  5159 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.