Journal Article

Five Cases of Paralytic Strabismus as a Rare Feature of Lyme Disease

Arnaud Sauer, Yves Hansmann, Benoît Jaulhac, Tristan Bourcier and Claude Speeg-Schatz

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 48, issue 6, pages 756-759
Published in print March 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597041
Five Cases of Paralytic Strabismus as a Rare Feature of Lyme Disease

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Lyme borreliosis is the most common human tick-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere. The prevalence of Lyme borreliosis is estimated to be 20–100 cases per 100,000 persons in the United States and 100–155 cases per 100,000 persons in Europe [1, 2]. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato [2, 3]. The course of clinical manifestations is thought to occur in 3 stages: early, disseminated, and chronic [2, 4]. Lyme borreliosis can cause a variety of ocular manifestations, and the frequency of these manifestations among cases of Lyme disease involving systemic manifestations is ∼1% [5].

Journal Article.  1834 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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