Journal Article

Effect of Selenium Supplements on Hemoglobin Concentration and Morbidity among HIV-1–Infected Tanzanian Women

Roland Kupka, Ferdinand Mugusi, Said Aboud, Ellen Hertzmark, Donna Spiegelman and Wafaie W. Fawzi

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 48, issue 10, pages 1475-1478
Published in print May 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/598334
Effect of Selenium Supplements on Hemoglobin Concentration and Morbidity among HIV-1–Infected Tanzanian Women

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Selenium deficiency may increase risks of anemia and morbidity among people with human immunodeficiency virus infection. We therefore investigated the effect of selenium supplements (200 µg of selenomethionine) on these end points among 915 pregnant Tanzanian women. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at baseline (at 12–27 weeks of gestation) and at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and morbidity data were collected during monthly visits to the clinic. Selenium supplements had no effect on hemoglobin concentrations during follow-up (mean difference, 0.05 g/dL; 95% confidence interval, −0.07 to 0.16 g/dL) but reduced diarrheal morbidity risk by 40% (relative risk, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.42–0.84). There was no effect on the other morbidity end points.

Journal Article.  2133 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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