Journal Article

Cryptococcosis in Solid-Organ, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, and Tissue Transplant Recipients: Evidence-Based Evolving Trends

Hsin-Yun Sun, Marilyn M. Wagener and Nina Singh

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 48, issue 11, pages 1566-1576
Published in print June 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/598936
Cryptococcosis in Solid-Organ, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, and Tissue Transplant Recipients: Evidence-Based Evolving Trends

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The impact of current transplantation practices on the characteristics of cryptococcosis in solid-organ transplant recipients is not well defined. The incidence of cryptococcal disease among solid-organ transplant recipients has remained unchanged; however, patients are less likely to present with central nervous system or disseminated disease and are more likely to have cryptococcosis limited to the lungs. Additionally, lipid formulations of amphotericin B are now used more frequently, whereas their use in combination with flucytosine has decreased. The overall mortality of cryptococcosis has significantly improved in the current era. Renal failure remains associated with poor outcome, whereas use of lipid formulations of amphotericin B is associated with a higher survival rate. Despite rare infectious complication, certain peculiar attributes of cryptococcal disease in hematopoietic stem cell recipients and tissue transplant recipients warrant recognition.

Journal Article.  6788 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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