Journal Article

Rotavirus and the Indigenous Children of the Australian Outback: Monovalent Vaccine Effective in a High-Burden Setting

Thomas L. Snelling, Rosalie Schultz, Julie Graham, Robert Roseby, Graeme L. Barnes, Ross M. Andrews and Jonathan R. Carapetis

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 49, issue 3, pages 428-431
Published in print August 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/600395
Rotavirus and the Indigenous Children of the Australian Outback: Monovalent Vaccine Effective in a High-Burden Setting

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Indigenous children living in arid Central Australia experience frequent outbreaks of rotavirus gastroenteritis. A widespread outbreak of G9 rotavirus infection occurred several months after introduction of the RIX4414 rotavirus vaccine. We performed a retrospective case-control study to determine vaccine efficacy during the outbreak. Two doses provided an estimated vaccine efficacy of 77.7% (95% confidence interval, 40.2%-91.7%) against hospitalization for gastroenteritis. Vaccine efficacy was 84.5% (95% confidence interval, 23.4%-96.9%) against confirmed cases of rotavirus infection. Vaccination was effective in this high-burden setting.

Journal Article.  2060 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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