Journal Article

A Multinational Survey of Risk Factors for Infection with Extended-Spectrum <i>β</i>-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Nonhospitalized Patients

Ronen Ben-Ami, Jesús Rodríguez-Baño, Hande Arslan, Johann D. D. Pitout, Claudine Quentin, Esther S. Calbo, Özlem K. Azap, Corinne Arpin, Alvaro Pascual, David M. Livermore, Javier Garau and Yehuda Carmeli

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 49, issue 5, pages 682-690
Published in print September 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/604713
A Multinational Survey of Risk Factors for Infection with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Nonhospitalized Patients

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are increasing in frequency and are associated with high mortality rates. Circulation of CTX-M-type ESBLs in the community is of particular concern, because it may confound standard infection-control measures.

Methods. We analyzed the results of epidemiologic studies of infection caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in nonhospitalized patients from 6 centers in Europe, Asia, and North America. Risk factors for infection with an ESBL-producing organism were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results. A total of 983 patient-specific isolates were reviewed (890 [90.5%] of which were Escherichia coli, 68 [6.9%] of which were Klebsiella species, and 25 [2.5%] of which were Proteus mirabilis ); 339 [34.5%] of the isolates produced ESBLs. CTX-M types were the most frequent ESBLs (accounting for 65%). Rates of co-resistance to ciprofloxacin among ESBL-producing isolates were high (>70%), but significant variation was seen among centers with respect to rates of resistance to gentamicin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Similar risk factors for infection with an ESBL-producing organism were found in the different participating centers. Significant risk factors, identified by multivariate analysis, were recent antibiotic use, residence in a long-term care facility, recent hospitalization, age ⩾65 years, and male sex (area under the receiver-operator characteristic [ROC] curve, 0.80). However, 34% of ESBL-producing isolates (115 of 336 isolates) were obtained from patients with no recent health care contact; the area under the ROC curve for the multivariate model for this group of patients was only 0.70, which indicated poorer predictive value.

Conclusions. Community-acquired ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae are now prevalent worldwide, necessitating international collaboration. Novel approaches are required to adequately address issues such as empirical treatment for severe community-acquired infection and infection control.

Journal Article.  4223 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.