Journal Article

Management of the Catheter in Documented Catheter-Related Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Bacteremia: Remove or Retain?

Issam Raad, Rawan Kassar, Dany Ghannam, Anne Marie Chaftari, Ray Hachem and Ying Jiang

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 49, issue 8, pages 1187-94
Published in print October 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/605694
Management of the Catheter in Documented Catheter-Related Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Bacteremia: Remove or Retain?

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Background. Studies and guidelines recommending the retention of the central venous catheter (CVC) in patients with coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia were based on loose definitions of bacteremia and/or did not evaluate the risk of recurrence. In this study, we used strict definitions of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia to determine the impact of CVC retention on response to and recurrence of infection.

Methods. During the period from July 2005 through December 2007, we retrospectively evaluated 188 patients with coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia. Bacteremia was defined using the strict Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria of 2 positive blood culture results. Catheter-related bacteremia was confirmed by differential quantitative blood cultures (⩾3:1) or time to positivity (>2 h).

Results. Resolution of infection within 48 h after commencement of antimicrobial therapy was not influenced by CVC removal or exchange versus retention and occurred in 175 patients (93%). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that infection was 7.0 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5–32.6 times) more likely to fail to resolve in patients with an intensive care unit stay prior to infection (P=.013) and 3.8 times (95% CI, 1.1–13.3 times) more likely to fail to resolve in patients who had other concurrent sites of infection (P=.041). Duration of therapy did not affect recurrence. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with catheter retention were 6.6 times (95% CI, 1.8–23.9 times) more likely to have a recurrence than were those whose catheter was removed or exchanged (P=.004).

Conclusions. CVC retention does not have an impact on the resolution of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia but is a significant risk factor of recurrence.

Journal Article.  4268 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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