Journal Article

Retention in Opioid Substitution Treatment: A Major Predictor of Long-Term Virological Success for HIV-Infected Injection Drug Users Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment

Perrine Roux, M. Patrizia Carrieri, Julien Cohen, Isabelle Ravaux, Isabelle Poizot-Martin, Pierre Dellamonica and Bruno Spire

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 49, issue 9, pages 1433-1440
Published in print November 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/630209
Retention in Opioid Substitution Treatment: A Major Predictor of Long-Term Virological Success for HIV-Infected Injection Drug Users Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background.The positive impact of opioid substitution treatment (OST) on opioid-dependent individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is well documented, especially with regard to adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We used the data from a 5-year longitudinal study of the MANIF 2000 cohort of individuals infected with HIV (as a result of injection drug use) and receiving HAART to investigate the predictors of long-term virological success.

Design.Data were collected every 6 months from outpatient hospital services delivering HIV care in France. We selected all patients who were receiving HAART for at least 6 months (baseline visit) and who had indications for OST (ie, still dependent on opioids). We selected a total of 113 patients, accounting for a total of 562 visits for all the analyses.

Methods.Long-term virological success was defined as an undetectable viral load after at least 6 months on HAART. Retention in OST was defined as the time interval between the last initiation or reinitiation of OST during HAART follow-up and any given visit on OST. A mixed logistic model was used to identify predictors of long-term virological success.

Results.At baseline, 53 patients were receiving buprenorphine, 28 patients were receiving methadone, and 32 patients were not on OST. The median duration of OST was 25 months (range, 3–42 months). In the multivariate analysis, after adjustment for significant predictors of long-term virological success such as adherence to HAART and early virological response, retention in OST was associated with long-term virological success (odds ratio, 1.20 per 6-month increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.32).

Conclusions.Our study presents important evidence of the positive impact of retention in OST on HIV outcomes. Increasing access to OST based on a comprehensive model of care for HIV-infected patients who have indications for OST may foster adherence and ensure long-term response to HAART.

Journal Article.  4681 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.