Journal Article

Telavancin: A Novel Lipoglycopeptide

Louis D. Saravolatz, Gary E. Stein and Leonard B. Johnson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 49, issue 12, pages 1908-1914
Published in print December 2009 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2009 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/648438
Telavancin: A Novel Lipoglycopeptide

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Telavancin, a derivative of vancomycin, is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that has been shown to be effective for the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections. It has also been effective in the treatment of gram-positive pneumonia. This antibiotic has a dual mechanism of action by inhibiting peptidoglycan synthesis and causing membrane depolarization. Telavancin is consistently active against Staphylococcus aureus , including methicillin-resistant S. aureus , vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus , linezolid-resistant S. aureus , and daptomycin-nonsusceptible strains. The drug is usually administrated intravenously at 10 mg/kg every 24 h. Telavancin is excreted by the kidneys, and thus, dosage adjustments are required in cases of renal failure. Clinical trials have demonstrated non-inferiority, compared with vancomycin, in the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections and pneumonia. Telavancin is associated with higher rates of renal events, altered taste, nausea, and vomiting but lesser rates of pruritus and infusion-related events, compared with vancomycin.

Journal Article.  4386 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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