Journal Article

Reactive Arthritis after Enteric Infections in the United States: The Problem of Definition

John M. Townes

Edited by Frederick J. Angulo

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 50, issue 2, pages 247-254
Published in print January 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/649540
Reactive Arthritis after Enteric Infections in the United States: The Problem of Definition

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Bacterial enteric infections cause substantial morbidity in the United States both from acute illness and sequelae that follow. Reactive arthritis (ReA) is a poorly defined term that is used to describe a variety of rheumatologic phenomena that may occur after Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia infection, as well as other types of infections (eg, Chlamydia). This review focuses on clinical and epidemiologic investigations of ReA following bacterial enteric infection in the United States.

Only 2 population-based studies of ReA following enteric infection have been performed in the United States. ReA following outbreaks of Campylobacter and Yersinia infection has not been studied, and investigations following Shigella and Salmonella outbreaks have focused primarily on the more narrowly defined, but now outdated, concept of “Reiter's syndrome” rather than ReA. Additional epidemiologic studies are needed to determine the burden of illness due to ReA following enteric infection, but a clearer definition of the term is a prerequisite.

Journal Article.  5944 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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