Journal Article

Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: “There must be some kind of way out of here”

J. Peter Cegielski

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 50, issue Supplement_3, pages S195-S200
Published in print May 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/651491
Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: “There must be some kind of way out of here”

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Over the past 7 decades, Mycobacterium tuberculosis has developed resistance to virtually every new drug used to treat tuberculosis, resulting recently in the global emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. In an individual, treatment with a single new drug results in acquired drug resistance within weeks to months. On a population basis, the pattern is just as consistent. After a new drug is introduced, drug-resistant cases or case series are reported within months to years, typically leading to focused surveys, and within several years, dramatic outbreaks with extraordinary mortality occur. Invariably, such outbreaks prove to be the tip of the iceberg. Incomplete and delayed diagnoses, drug costs, and drug supplies are frequently implicated. With new drugs and new diagnostics on the horizon, we must develop new ways of incorporating them into public health practice, basing treatment on rapid drug-susceptibility tests, ensuring that effective drugs are always used in combination, and making these drug available to persons who need them.

Journal Article.  4825 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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