Journal Article

Tuberculosis as Part of the Natural History of HIV Infection in Developing Countries

Gabriel Chamie, Annie Luetkemeyer, Edwin Charlebois and Diane V. Havlir

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 50, issue Supplement_3, pages S245-S254
Published in print May 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/651498
Tuberculosis as Part of the Natural History of HIV Infection in Developing Countries

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An enhanced, refocused research agenda is critical to reducing the burden of tuberculosis (TB) in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in developing countries. TB threatens HIV-infected patients before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, is difficult to diagnose, is rapidly fatal when it is drug resistant, and is being spread in clinics and hospitals. Research priorities include improved and point-of-care TB diagnostics; TB treatment and prevention during HIV infection, drug-resistant TB, and childhood TB; and optimization of TB and HIV program integration. With new TB diagnostics and drugs reaching approval, research must focus on effectively deploying these advancements. Research must include evaluations of individual, household, health care, and community approaches. Studies must apply implementation science to determine how to increase and adapt effective interventions to reduce TB burden in the context of HIV infection. Investment in this research will improve the lives of persons infected with HIV and contribute to efforts to reduce the global TB burden.

Journal Article.  6527 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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