Journal Article

Treatment of Bacterial Prostatitis

Benjamin A. Lipsky, Ivor Byren and Christopher T. Hoey

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 50, issue 12, pages 1641-1652
Published in print June 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/652861
Treatment of Bacterial Prostatitis

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Prostatitis is characterized by voiding symptoms and genitourinary pain and is sometimes associated with sexual dysfunction. Up to 25% of men receive a diagnosis of prostatitis in their lifetime, but <10% have a proven bacterial infection. The causes and treatment of nonbacterial prostatitis are largely unknown, but bacterial prostatitis is caused by infection with uropathogens, especially gram-negative bacilli, although infection is sometimes due to gram-positive and atypical microorganisms. Acute bacterial prostatitis is easily diagnosed (by abrupt urogential and often systemic symptoms, along with bacteriuria) and treated (by systemic antibiotic therapy). Chronic bacterial prostatitis is characterized by prolonged or recurrent symptoms and relapsing bacteriuria; diagnosis traditionally requires comparing urinary specimens obtained before with specimens obtained after prostatic massage. Treating chronic bacterial prostatitis requires prolonged therapy with an antibiotic that penetrates the prostate (ie, one with high lipid solubility, a low degree of ionization, high dissociation constant, low protein binding, and small molecular size). We review recent pharmacological and clinical data on treating bacterial prostatitis.

Journal Article.  5929 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.