Journal Article

Preventing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections outside the Intensive Care Unit: Expanding Prevention to New Settings

Alexander J. Kallen, Priti R. Patel and Naomi P. O'Grady

Edited by Robert A. Weinstein

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 51, issue 3, pages 335-341
Published in print August 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/653942
Preventing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections outside the Intensive Care Unit: Expanding Prevention to New Settings

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With the growing recognition of the preventability of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), reducing the number of CRBSIs acquired in health care facilities has become an important patient safety goal. To date, most prevention efforts have been conducted in intensive care units (ICUs); however, many central venous catheters (CVCs) are found outside the ICU, and rates of catheter-associated bloodstream infections in these settings appear to be similar to rates of these infections in ICUs. CVCs are also used in patients who primarily receive their care as outpatients, including those requiring hemodialysis, undergoing treatment for malignancies, and receiving parenteral nutrition. In some of these patients, CVCs might be used for extended periods, prolonging the patient's time at risk for CRBSIs and highlighting the potential need to look beyond insertion-based interventions to prevent infections. To meet the goal of reducing the number of all CRBSIs associated with health care, further attention on CRBSIs occurring outside the ICU is needed; however, this effort will require a better understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of these infections.

Journal Article.  4682 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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