Journal Article

Rotavirus Antigenemia in Indian Children with Rotavirus Gastroenteritis and Asymptomatic Infections

Sasirekha Ramani, Anu Paul, Anuradha Saravanabavan, Vipin Kumar Menon, Rajesh Arumugam, Thuppal V. Sowmyanarayanan, Prasanna Samuel and Kang Gagandeep

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 51, issue 11, pages 1284-1289
Published in print December 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/657069
Rotavirus Antigenemia in Indian Children with Rotavirus Gastroenteritis and Asymptomatic Infections

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Rotavirus gastroenteritis results in significant morbidity and mortality in Indian children. Although there are numerous studies on rotavirus diarrhea, there are few reports on antigenemia and extraintestinal presentations in these populations.

Methods. Following screening for rotavirus antigen of stool samples from children with and without acute gastroenteritis with a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA), a total of 199 stool and serum sample pairs were identified for additional testing. All EIA-positive stool samples were genotyped, and viral load estimated by realtime reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum samples were tested for rotavirus antigen by an in-house EIA, and antigen was quantified by optical density. Scoring of disease severity was performed for all hospitalized children. Data on extra-intestinal presentations were collected if available.

Results. Based on screening of stool samples by EIA, the study population could be divided into 3 groups, including 111 children with rotavirus diarrhea, 44 children with diarrhea and no rotavirus detected in stool specimens, and 44 children with asymptomatic rotavirus infection. Antigenemia was significantly higher among children with rotavirus diarrhea (50.4%) than among children with non-rotaviral diarrhea (16%) or asymptomatic infections (2.3%) (P<.001). Low copies of rotavirus were detected by RT-PCR in all 7 children with EIA-negative stool specimens and antigenemia. Presence and levels of rotavirus antigen in serum specimens correlated with stool viral load. Children with antigenemia had significantly more-severe disease but not more extraintestinal presentations than did children without antigenemia.

Conclusions. Antigenemia occurs frequently in rotavirus infection and correlates with virus replication in the gut but not with extra-intestinal presentations.

Journal Article.  3610 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.