Journal Article

Influenza Vaccine Given to Pregnant Women Reduces Hospitalization Due to Influenza in Their Infants

Isaac Benowitz, Daina B. Esposito, Kristina D. Gracey, Eugene D. Shapiro and Marietta Vázquez

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 51, issue 12, pages 1355-1361
Published in print December 2010 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2010 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/657309
Influenza Vaccine Given to Pregnant Women Reduces Hospitalization Due to Influenza in Their Infants

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Background. Infants aged <12 months are at high risk of hospitalization for influenza. Influenza vaccine is recommended for pregnant women and for most children; however, no vaccine is approved for infants aged !6 months. Effective approaches are needed to protect this vulnerable population. Vaccination of women during pregnancy may protect the infant through transfer of antibodies from the mother. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of this strategy, and those studies produced mixed results.

Methods. In a matched case-control study, case patients were infants aged <12 months admitted to a large urban hospital in the northeastern United States because of laboratory-confirmed influenza from 2000 to 2009. For each case, we enrolled 1 or 2 control subjects who were infants who tested negative for influenza and matched cases by date of birth and date of hospitalization (within 4 weeks). Vaccine effectiveness was calculated on the basis of matched odds ratios and was adjusted for confounding.

Results. The mothers of 2 (2.2%) of 91 case subjects and 31 (19.9%) of 156 control subjects aged <6 months, and 1 (4.6%) of 22 case subjects and 2 (5.6%) of 36 control subjects aged ⩾6 months, had received influenza vaccine during pregnancy. The effectiveness of influenza vaccine given to mothers during pregnancy in preventing hospitalization among their infants, adjusted for potential confounders, was 91.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.7%–98.1%; P = .001) for infants aged <6 months. The unadjusted effectiveness was 90.7% (95% CI, 59.9%–97.8%; P = .001).

Conclusions. Influenza vaccine given to pregnant women is 91.5% effective in preventing hospitalization of their infants for influenza in the first 6 months of life.

Journal Article.  3948 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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