Chapter

Hamilton's Quantification of the Predicate

Robert J. Fogelin

in Philosophical Interpretations

Published in print April 1992 | ISBN: 9780195071627
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199833221 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/019507162X.003.0011
Hamilton's Quantification of the Predicate

Show Summary Details

Preview

These essays offer an exposition and defense of William Hamilton's theory that categorical propositions implicitly involve quantification over the predicate term; e.g., for Hamilton, “All S is P” is more accurately rendered as, “All S is some P.” This makes good sense if we treat this proposition as an embedded identity statement, i.e., “If anything is an S then there is some P it is identical with.” This approach yields a coherent theory of the distribution of terms that can be used for evaluating the validity of both immediate inferences and categorical syllogism. It also captures a fragment of the identity theory.

Keywords: categorical propositions; categorical syllogisms; distribution; Hamilton; identity; quantification theory; validity

Chapter.  5851 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.