Chapter

The Boom in Education

Alice H. Amsden

in Asia's Next Giant

Published in print June 1992 | ISBN: 9780195076035
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199870691 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195076036.003.0009
The Boom in Education

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One reason why Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea appear to have industrialized rapidly is that they have invested relatively heavily in education. A well‐educated work force, both white‐ and blue‐collar, is a general property of late industrialization, distinguishing it from earlier industrial change, and premised on the learning of production processes and procedures that are characteristic of more advanced economies. Thus, formal education of the workforce and the apprenticeship of firms to foreign technical assistants (rather than the apprenticeship of workers in particular crafts) lie at the heart of late industrial expansion. This chapter, therefore, is devoted to both formal education and foreign technical assistance, and ends with a firm‐level illustration of interaction between the two. Learning is explored in the second manufacturing affiliate of the Samsung Group, the Cheil Wood Company, founded in 1954.

Keywords: apprenticeship; Cheil Wood Company; education; foreign technical assistance; formal education; Japan; late industrialization; learning; Samsung Group; South Korea; Taiwan

Chapter.  9126 words. 

Subjects: Economic Development and Growth

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