Chapter

The Hiddenness of God: Introduction

Robert McKim

in Religious Ambiguity and Religious Diversity

Published in print April 2001 | ISBN: 9780195128352
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199834488 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195128354.003.0001
The Hiddenness of God: Introduction

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There are many reasons to believe that, if God exists, God is in large measure hidden from us. The hiddenness of God is one aspect of the religious ambiguity of the world. Since the world is religiously ambiguous, it may reasonably be interpreted either in secular terms or in terms provided by any one of a number of religious traditions. Theists have made many attempts to account for God's hiddenness, some of which contend that the advantages of God's hiddenness (“goods of mystery”) outweigh whatever benefits would result if God's existence and nature were clear to us (“goods of clarity”). One such good of clarity may be that belief in God would be more common than is now the case. Other attempts to account for the hiddenness of God appeal to human defectiveness or to divine transcendence.

Keywords: divine transcendence; goods; hiddenness of God; human defectiveness; mystery; religious ambiguity

Chapter.  14514 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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