Chapter

Doxastic Voluntarism and the Ethics of Belief

Robert Audi

in Knowledge, Truth, and Duty

Published in print March 2001 | ISBN: 9780195128925
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199833764 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195128923.003.0007
Doxastic Voluntarism and the Ethics of Belief

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Attempts to find a place for an ethics of belief given that belief is not under voluntary control. Distinguishes between a behavioral and a genetic version of doxastic voluntarism and rejects both. According to the writer, belief formation is not causing oneself to believe something, but simply a belief's forming. How, then, can there be an ethics of belief? Suggests the following: We may say that it is morally objectionable to conduct one's intellectual life sloppily, and that we should accept an epistemic obligation to be attentive to one's evidence, from where we will be led to an ethics of inquiry.

Keywords: action; belief; doxastic voluntarism; ethics of belief; practical reasons; theoretical reasons

Chapter.  11844 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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