Chapter

The Antinomian Moment

Louise A. Breen

in Transgressing the Bounds

Published in print March 2001 | ISBN: 9780195138009
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199834006 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195138007.003.0002

Series: Religion in America

The Antinomian Moment

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Analyzes the antinomian controversy of the late 1630s with an eye toward explaining why distinct social constituencies aligned themselves as they did. It examines the wide range of beliefs and people that Massachusetts authorities forced under the “antinomian” umbrella, and analyzes the roles played by individuals on both sides, including John Wheelwright, Israel Stoughton, Thomas Savage, Edward Hutchinson, Edward Gibbons, Thomas Lechford, Thomas Shepard, and John Winthrop. It argues that religious orthodoxy in Massachusetts functioned to affirm the local colonial identity, to privilege the public sphere over the private, and to draw people together toward communal goals in a shared geographic space.

Keywords: antinomian controversy; Gibbons; Hutchinson; Lechford; Savage; Shepard; Stoughton; Wheelwright

Chapter.  19544 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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