Chapter

Civil Society

Azzam S. Tamimi

in Rachid Ghannouchi

Published in print December 2001 | ISBN: 9780195140002
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199834723 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195140001.003.0005

Series: Religion and Global Politics

Civil Society

Show Summary Details

Preview

Islamic society is a civil society, one that has been undermined by the enforced process of secularization, thus impairing its ability to sustain a genuine process of democratization.

Like John Keane, El‐Affandi, and others Ghannouchi takes issue with Ernest Gellner in his refusal to include Islamic society within the category of a civil society.

Islamic law and faith both play a vital role in civilizing and pacifying individuals.

The Islamic concept of taqwa (the fear of God) motivates citizens to be law‐abiding individuals, thus reducing the cost to both state and society.

Contrary to the effect of Islam, secularism is seen as a major contributor to much of the brutality that human societies suffer from.

Keywords: El‐Affandi; brutality; civil society; Gellner; Islamic law; Islamic society; Keane; Taqwa

Chapter.  17395 words. 

Subjects: Islam

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.