Chapter

The Importance of Bush <i>v.</i> Gore to All Americans

Alan M. Dershowitz

in Supreme Injustice

Published in print January 2003 | ISBN: 9780195158076
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780199869848 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195158075.003.0006
 The Importance of Bush v. Gore to All Americans

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Aims to demonstrate that, during the (Bush vs Gore) US presidential election of 2000, by any reasonable standard of evaluation, the majority justices of the US Supreme Court failed to test the US constitutional system in ways that it had never been tested before, and did so not because of incompetence, but because of malice aforethought. Discusses the importance of Bush vs Gore to all Americans, and starts by noting that Bush vs Gore is certainly not the first bad Supreme Court ruling. It looks at some of the other evil, immoral, and even dangerous, decisions made, most of which have been overturned by later courts and condemned by the verdict of history. However, for the most part, the justices who wrote or joined the majority opinions for these terrible decisions were acting consistently with their own judicial philosophies; Bush vs Gore was different because the majority justices violated their own previously declared judicial principles, and in this respect, the decision in the Florida election (recount) case may be ranked as the single most corrupt decision in Supreme Court history. The different sections of the chapter discuss why criticism and accountability are important, some lessons to be learned from Bush vs Gore, the wages of Roe vs Wade (a controversial abortion case that helped to secure the presidency for Ronald Reagan), and changing how justices are selected.

Keywords: abortion; accountability; bad US Supreme Court rulings; George W. Bush; Bush vs Gore; corruption; criticism; election recount; Florida; Florida recount; Al Gore; judicial principles; Roe vs Wade; Ronald Reagan; US constitution; US justice selection; US presidential election 2000; US Supreme Court; USA

Chapter.  11133 words. 

Subjects: US Politics

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