Chapter

 PATTERNS OF AUTONOMY ACKNOWLEDGMENT, AND ADVOCACY

Lorraine Code

in Ecological Thinking

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780195159431
Published online September 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780199786411 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195159438.003.0006

Series: Studies in Feminist Philosophy

  PATTERNS OF AUTONOMY ACKNOWLEDGMENT, AND ADVOCACY

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This chapter addresses the covert capacity of autonomy — the goal of moral-political life in liberal-democratic societies — to oppress women and others who fail to fulfill its requirements. Taking the collapse of the welfare state as a locus of analysis, it shows how ecological citizenship and collective responsibility work toward reconfiguring the inequalities and injustices enacted under the aegis of a too-rigorous veneration of autonomy. One of the projects of the chapter is to reevaluate practices of advocacy in knowledge: a point that arises in chapter three with reference to medicine and is further developed here, both in connection with medicine and across a wider range of examples. Contrary to entrenched conceptions of epistemic self-reliance, the contention is that advocacy often makes knowledge possible: indeed, more radically, that without advocacy certain knowings are not possible. Trust is important to good advocacy, and testimony again plays a central part.

Keywords: autonomy; advocacy; oppression; ecological citizenship; knowledge; testimony; trust

Chapter.  15043 words. 

Subjects: Feminist Philosophy

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