Chapter

The Work of Love

M. Gail Hamner

in Opting for the Margins

Published in print September 2003 | ISBN: 9780195161199
Published online January 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780199835201 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/019516119X.003.0009

Series: AAR Reflection and Theory in the Study of Religion Series

 The Work of Love

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The author contends that the feminist politics of Donna Haraway, Kaja Silverman, and Luce Irigaray–despite theirdistance from Christian discourse–deploy love as a Christian-inflected option for the marginalized, as the basis for their attempt to stand with and advocate for those without power or voice. Although ultimately each project fails to accomplish what it attempts, what is noteworthy is the desire to deploy (Christian) love toward political ends. By recognizing the need for coalition politics and nonessentializing conceptions of subjectivity, the political appeal to love allows an escape from both the futility of identity politics and the cynicism of postmodernism.

Keywords: feminist politics; Haraway, Donna; identity politics; Irigaray, Luce; love; postmodernism; Silverman, Kaja

Chapter.  10217 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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