Chapter

Strategic Reliabilism: The Costs and Benefits of Excellent Judgment

Michael A Bishop and J. D. Trout

in Epistemology and the Psychology of Human Judgment

Published in print January 2005 | ISBN: 9780195162295
Published online July 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780199835539 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195162293.003.0006
 Strategic Reliabilism: The Costs and Benefits of Excellent Judgment

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Strategic Reliabilism addresses resource allocation considerations within a cost-benefit framework. However, there are serious reasons to worry about the feasibility of a cost-benefit approach to epistemology. First, there are serious general objections to cost-benefit analyses; and second, it is not clear how we can identify the costs and benefits of reasoning. This chapter addresses these two concerns. It is argued that although many of the deep general concerns about cost-benefit analysis are legitimate, flawed cost-benefit analyses can be very useful, especially if we are clear about the ways in which such analyses are flawed. It is further argued that there are measurable proxies for the costs and benefits of reasoning we can employ in a cost-benefit approach to epistemology.

Keywords: epistemology; resource allocation; cost-benefit approach; human reasoning

Chapter.  5484 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Metaphysics

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