Chapter

Berkeleyan Idealism: The Inseparability of Existence, Sensation, and Perception

Wayne Waxman

in Kant and the Empiricists

Published in print July 2005 | ISBN: 9780195177398
Published online February 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780199786176 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195177398.003.0012
 Berkeleyan Idealism: The Inseparability of Existence, Sensation, and Perception

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • History of Western Philosophy

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Berkeley’s most famous, original, and influential thesis is: the esse of sensible things is percipi. The argument of esse is percipi idealism is that: ideas can exist only in being perceived; sensible objects (stones, trees, mountains, etc.) are ideas; and therefore, sensible objects can exist only in being perceived. Berkeley’s response to possible objections to esse is percipi, his psychologistic explication of existence, and interpretations of Berkeleyan idealism are discussed.

Keywords: George Berkeley; idealism; esse; percipi; existence; perception; sensation

Chapter.  12339 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.