Chapter

The Supreme Principle of Hume's Theory of Understanding

Wayne Waxman

in Kant and the Empiricists

Published in print July 2005 | ISBN: 9780195177398
Published online February 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780199786176 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195177398.003.0021
 The Supreme Principle of Hume's Theory of Understanding

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This chapter examines Hume’s skepticism with regard to reason and the supreme principle of human understanding that emerges from it. It is argued that skepticism with regard to reason is intimately bound up with the pre-eminence Hume assigned to the affective dimension of mentation in the determination of thoughts and actions. The neglect of that dimension appears responsible for much of the incomprehension and hostility met by Hume’s skepticism in all its forms.

Keywords: David Hume; skepticism; reason; understanding

Chapter.  11950 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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