Chapter

Cause and Effect

Kenneth P. Winkler

in Berkeley: An Interpretation

Published in print March 1994 | ISBN: 9780198235095
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191598685 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198235097.003.0005

Series: Clarendon Paperbacks

Cause and Effect

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Berkeley holds that only spirits can be causes. I trace this conclusion to his belief that minds or spirits are able to render their effects intelligible in a way that unthinking things cannot. Causes and their effects are not (or not always) necessarily connected, in Berkeley's view, but there is more to causation than constant conjunction or regular association.

Keywords: cause; constant conjunction; effect; intelligibility; necessary connection; spirit

Chapter.  14923 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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