Chapter

Self and Self‐Consciousness

Gabriele Taylor

in Deadly Vices

Published in print June 2006 | ISBN: 9780198235804
Published online September 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191604058 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198235801.003.0004
 Self and Self‐Consciousness

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This chapter explores the nature of self and self-consciousness. The self is that which gives a person her identity as she herself sees it, and that means that she has sufficient complexity to be able to form intentions, to evaluate and select. Self-consciousness is itself constitutive of the self, and constituent of the self are consequently evaluations and decisions about what it is worthwhile to do and what to avoid, about the sort of life one wants to lead, and the kind of person one wants to be. The interdependence of the elements of the shape of experiences means that they will be ‘edited’, that some experiences will be seen as important and others as negligible according to how they fit into existing frameworks of beliefs and inclinations.

Keywords: self; self-consciousness; self-deception; experience; belief

Chapter.  7117 words. 

Subjects: Moral Philosophy

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