Chapter

The Irreducibility of the Concept of the Self

Donald Davidson

in Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective

Published in print September 2001 | ISBN: 9780198237532
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191597312 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198237537.003.0006

Series: The Philosophical Essays of Donald Davidson (5 Volumes)

The Irreducibility of the Concept of the Self

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Having attacked a number of features that some views have regarded as constitutive of the concept of ‘the self’, Davidson now discusses those features that he thinks should replace the traditional ones. He especially emphasizes the special authority that our propositional attitudes are equipped with and the irreducible role of indexical sentences. In Davidson's opinion, the thoughts expressed by indexical sentences relate us to the world around us and thereby form a constitutive component of our concept of the self.

Keywords: concept; indexical sentences; indexicals; irreducibility; propositional attitudes; the self

Chapter.  3037 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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