Chapter

Concluding Remarks

Christopher Peacocke

in Being Known

Published in print March 1999 | ISBN: 9780198238607
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191598197 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198238606.003.0008
 Concluding Remarks

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The objectivity of some area of thought can often be acknowledged without postulating an exotic metaphysics. Statements that may seem to be the merest truisms may have previously hidden metaphysical or epistemological significance. No conclusions about the mind‐dependence of some subject matter can be drawn from the fact that in certain circumstances, it is a priori that a thinker will be right about that subject matter. The notion of an implicit conception with a certain content looms large in an account of understanding. We can learn more about metaphysics and epistemology by considering them not in isolation, but in the light of the relations they must bear to one another.

Keywords: epistemology; implicit conception; metaphysics; mind‐dependence; objectivity; truism

Chapter.  718 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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