Chapter

Kant and Transcendentalism

J. L. Mackie

in The Cement of the Universe

Published in print September 1980 | ISBN: 9780198246428
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191597954 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198246420.003.0005

Series: Clarendon Library of Logic and Philosophy

 Kant and Transcendentalism

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In this chapter, Mackie examines Kant's account of causation and also that of some more recent Kantian approaches such as those of Bennett and Strawson. He raises questions regarding certain assumptions involved in the formulation of a transcendental account of causation such as the requirement of self‐consciousness. The problematic nature of the contingency of the limits of human imagination is also raised. Strawson's examination of Kant's account of causation in the Second Analogy is discussed. Mackie concludes that the general Kantian approach is incapable of giving a satisfactory account of causation.

Keywords: Bennett; consciousness; Kant; P. F. Strawson; transcendentalism

Chapter.  11441 words. 

Subjects: Metaphysics

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