Chapter

Leibniz's Contained‐Predicate Doctrine

Jonathan Bennett

in Learning from Six Philosophers Volume 1

Published in print February 2001 | ISBN: 9780198250913
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191597053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198250916.003.0018

Series: Learning from Six Philosophers (2 Volumes)

 Leibniz's Contained‐Predicate Doctrine

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What the contained‐predicate doctrine (CPD) is, and its source in Leibniz's problem about individual reference—one he could have solved better if he had allowed inter‐substance causation and indexicals is covered. Gives his attempt to reconcile the CPD with there being contingent subject–predicate propositions; and infinite analysis. Leibniz's great mistake of construing the CPD as though it were causal rather than logical, and his attempt to reconcile it with human freedom are also dealt with.

Keywords: causation; freedom; indexical; infinity; Leibniz; reference

Chapter.  12388 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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