Chapter

The Bishops: Aristocratic Vocations

John McManners

in Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France Volume 1: The Clerical Establishment and its Social Ramifications

Published in print July 1999 | ISBN: 9780198270034
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600685 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198270038.003.0008

Series: Oxford History of the Christian Church

 The Bishops: Aristocratic Vocations

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Bishops were appointed by the crown, and the vast majority were drawn from the aristocracy. Connections at court were very useful for those seeking appointments, while noble families would place one of their younger sons in the Church. Young noblemen destined for ecclesiastical careers had to qualify themselves for selection by pursuing university studies at the Sorbonne to the grade of licence, often supplemented by study at the seminary of St Sulpice, and then by serving an apprenticeship in diocesan administration as a grand vicaire.

Keywords: bishops; Church administration; education; nobility; seminaries; universities

Chapter.  11792 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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