Chapter

The Great Chapters: Architecture and Music

John McManners

in Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France Volume 1: The Clerical Establishment and its Social Ramifications

Published in print July 1999 | ISBN: 9780198270034
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600685 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198270038.003.0016

Series: Oxford History of the Christian Church

 The Great Chapters: Architecture and Music

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The eighteenth century was an age of liturgical splendour, and changes to cathedral and collegiate church architecture reflected this, judiciously combining classical and Gothic elements. The removal of rood screens and changes in the admission of light through windows served to emphasize the centrality of the altar in the liturgical space. Chapters spent up to a quarter of their incomes on music, with renowned maîtres de musique being in great demand. Choir schools attached to chapters were the only source of musical training available, and maintained a high standard. Church music was increasingly complex, sophisticated, and virtuosic, following the tastes of the royal court and Parisian high society.

Keywords: architecture; cathedrals; chapters; education; music

Chapter.  16626 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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