Chapter

Religious Practice

John McManners

in Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France Volume 2: The Religion of the People and the Politics of Religion

Published in print July 1999 | ISBN: 9780198270041
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600692 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198270046.003.0005

Series: Oxford History of the Christian Church

 Religious Practice

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The main religious duties imposed on the laity were regular attendance at mass and the Easter duties of communion and confession. The practice of these obligations during the eighteenth century held up better in the countryside than in the towns, though everywhere the atmosphere during services was often disorderly and irreverent. The creeping laicization of the eighteenth century is indicated in all the available documentation capable of being expressed in serial quantitative form, including the naming of ships, household furnishings, the practice of contraception, preambles and legacies in wills, and ordinations, but all with variations according to chronology, geography, and class. True de‐Christianization, however, only came with the Revolution.

Keywords: contraception; ex votos; laicization; ordinations; religious duties; wills

Chapter.  11391 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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